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fishporn - 619.4k posts

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  • Tag a friend who needs to catch a goliath grouper! 💪🎣 Check out that bend! 😱 👌
Follow @hurricaneboatanchors for more

Video by @barrettrods
.
  • Tag a friend who needs to catch a goliath grouper! 💪🎣 Check out that bend! 😱 👌
    Follow @hurricaneboatanchors for more

    Video by @barrettrods
    .
  • 5,266 42 15 March, 2019
  • Have you ever seen a baby Swordfish? 😎  How cool is this little guy cruising through the Marina!? 😃 👏
Follow @hurricaneboatanchors for more

Via @careychenart
.
  • Have you ever seen a baby Swordfish? 😎 How cool is this little guy cruising through the Marina!? 😃 👏
    Follow @hurricaneboatanchors for more

    Via @careychenart
    .
  • 8,388 49 21 March, 2019
  • That's a beautiful fish! 😍 👏 Do you know what this cool catch is?! It was released! ✌️ Follow @fishingworld.24h for more

Via @snagfish - pic by Earl Harper
  • That's a beautiful fish! 😍 👏 Do you know what this cool catch is?! It was released! ✌️ Follow @fishingworld.24h for more

    Via @snagfish - pic by Earl Harper
  • 573 10 21 March, 2019

Latest Instagram Posts

  • One of the more beautiful species from the trip, some sort of wrasse 👌
  • One of the more beautiful species from the trip, some sort of wrasse 👌
  • 24 1 40 minutes ago
  • Wow look at this baby river monster! 😍 🐟 Tag a friend! Do you know what this cute lil' fish is? 😁 Follow @fishingworld.24h for more!

Video by @laisspolao
  • Wow look at this baby river monster! 😍 🐟 Tag a friend! Do you know what this cute lil' fish is? 😁 Follow @fishingworld.24h for more!

    Video by @laisspolao
  • 54 4 1 hour ago
  • This #sergeantbaker fish was caught out of Sydney heads! 
It's a member of the Aulopidae and can grow up to 60cm. They feed of the bottom of the ocean. Making the deep reef environments their home and will readily take lures and any bait! 
Not the best eating, but a beautiful coloured fish 🐟

#sydneyfishingadventures
  • This #sergeantbaker fish was caught out of Sydney heads!
    It's a member of the Aulopidae and can grow up to 60cm. They feed of the bottom of the ocean. Making the deep reef environments their home and will readily take lures and any bait!
    Not the best eating, but a beautiful coloured fish 🐟

    #sydneyfishingadventures
  • 96 2 1 hour ago
  • Silver arowana jumping out for food! 🤪
That’s why so many arowanas break their jaw because of jumping towards the acuarium top 
What are your thoughts? 💭
———————————————————
Tag your friends! 🥳
Follow @fishtankz_ @fishtankz_ @fishtankz_ !!!
———————————————————
DM for advertisement! 📩📩📩📩
Turn on notifications! 🔔
———————————————————
Credits: @monsteraquabr
  • Silver arowana jumping out for food! 🤪
    That’s why so many arowanas break their jaw because of jumping towards the acuarium top
    What are your thoughts? 💭
    ———————————————————
    Tag your friends! 🥳
    Follow @fishtankz_ @fishtankz_ @fishtankz_ !!!
    ———————————————————
    DM for advertisement! 📩📩📩📩
    Turn on notifications! 🔔
    ———————————————————
    Credits: @monsteraquabr
  • 82 3 2 hours ago
  • Mosasaurs are an extinct group of large marine reptiles containing 38 genera in total. Their first fossil remains were discovered in a limestone quarry at Maastricht on the Meuse in 1764. Mosasaurs probably evolved from an extinct group of aquatic lizards known as aigialosaurs in the Early Cretaceous. During the last 20 million years of the Cretaceous period (Turonian-Maastrichtian ages), with the extinction of the ichthyosaurs and pliosaurs, mosasaurs became the dominant marine predators. They became extinct as a result of the K-Pg event at the end of the Cretaceous period, about 66 million years ago.
Mosasaurs breathed air, were powerful swimmers, and were well-adapted to living in the warm, shallow inland seas prevalent during the Late Cretaceous period. Mosasaurs were so well adapted to this environment that they gave birth to live young, rather than returning to the shore to lay eggs as sea turtlesdo.
The smallest-known mosasaur was Dallasaurus turneri, which was less than 1 m (3.3 ft) long. Larger mosasaurs were more typical, with many species growing longer than 4 m (13 ft). Mosasaurus hoffmannii, the largest known species, may have reached up to 17 m (56 ft) in length. Currently, the largest publicly exhibited mosasaur skeleton in the world is on display at the Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre in Morden, Manitoba. The specimen, nicknamed "Bruce", is just over 13 m (43 ft) long.
#marinebiology #whaleshark #jaw #greatwhiteshark #fish #lamnidae #organism #mouth #underwater #tigershark #lamniformes #shark #cartilaginousfish #deepseafish #wildlife #crocodile #tropical #coral #reeftank #water #swimming #ocean #freshwater #fishporn #paeontology #beautiful #reef #photooftheday #tropicalfish #dinosaur
  • Mosasaurs are an extinct group of large marine reptiles containing 38 genera in total. Their first fossil remains were discovered in a limestone quarry at Maastricht on the Meuse in 1764. Mosasaurs probably evolved from an extinct group of aquatic lizards known as aigialosaurs in the Early Cretaceous. During the last 20 million years of the Cretaceous period (Turonian-Maastrichtian ages), with the extinction of the ichthyosaurs and pliosaurs, mosasaurs became the dominant marine predators. They became extinct as a result of the K-Pg event at the end of the Cretaceous period, about 66 million years ago.
    Mosasaurs breathed air, were powerful swimmers, and were well-adapted to living in the warm, shallow inland seas prevalent during the Late Cretaceous period. Mosasaurs were so well adapted to this environment that they gave birth to live young, rather than returning to the shore to lay eggs as sea turtlesdo.
    The smallest-known mosasaur was Dallasaurus turneri, which was less than 1 m (3.3 ft) long. Larger mosasaurs were more typical, with many species growing longer than 4 m (13 ft). Mosasaurus hoffmannii, the largest known species, may have reached up to 17 m (56 ft) in length. Currently, the largest publicly exhibited mosasaur skeleton in the world is on display at the Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre in Morden, Manitoba. The specimen, nicknamed "Bruce", is just over 13 m (43 ft) long.
    #marinebiology #whaleshark #jaw #greatwhiteshark #fish #lamnidae #organism #mouth #underwater #tigershark #lamniformes #shark #cartilaginousfish #deepseafish #wildlife #crocodile #tropical #coral #reeftank #water #swimming #ocean #freshwater #fishporn #paeontology #beautiful #reef #photooftheday #tropicalfish #dinosaur
  • 50 3 4 hours ago
  • Fish catching
  • Fish catching
  • 34 3 5 hours ago
  • 36 4 6 hours ago