The Nature Conservancy ( @nature_org ) Instagram Profile

nature_org

The Nature Conservancy Worldwide conservation organization protecting lands and waters.

  • 2.5k posts
  • 615.1k followers
  • 297 following
  • We’re about a week away from the *official* start of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, but is it crazy to say... we’ll miss the view? 😲😍 Beautifully captured, @benstrauss_photography!
  • We’re about a week away from the *official* start of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, but is it crazy to say... we’ll miss the view? 😲😍 Beautifully captured, @benstrauss_photography!
  • 6,540 106 13 March, 2019
  • “If you can climb a ladder, you can rock climb,” says #WestVirginia climbing instructor Diane Kearns. “The sport is both mental and physical.” Beginners prepared to conquer their fear of heights can try the Via Ferrata near Nelson Rocks in West Virginia, a route of permanent bolts, safety cables and ladder rungs that also includes crossing a suspension bridge. The route doesn’t require many technical skills or learning how to place your own gear, just a local guide and a strong sense of adventure. You’ll be rewarded with an inspiring view from the ridge of this double-spine outcropping— and a major sense of accomplishment. 💪⛰ Who would you go rock climbing with? Check out this piece and more in the latest issue of our magazine (link in profile). Subscribe by becoming a member today. 
Photo by Adam Mowery/Tandem Stock.
  • “If you can climb a ladder, you can rock climb,” says #WestVirginia climbing instructor Diane Kearns. “The sport is both mental and physical.” Beginners prepared to conquer their fear of heights can try the Via Ferrata near Nelson Rocks in West Virginia, a route of permanent bolts, safety cables and ladder rungs that also includes crossing a suspension bridge. The route doesn’t require many technical skills or learning how to place your own gear, just a local guide and a strong sense of adventure. You’ll be rewarded with an inspiring view from the ridge of this double-spine outcropping— and a major sense of accomplishment. 💪⛰ Who would you go rock climbing with? Check out this piece and more in the latest issue of our magazine (link in profile). Subscribe by becoming a member today.
    Photo by Adam Mowery/Tandem Stock.
  • 3,680 34 12 March, 2019
  • “These days, when I drive across the city, I don’t see alleys, parking lots and abandoned buildings. I see empty spaces waiting to be wild again. It’s like a blank canvas.

As conservationists, we should be taking advantage of nature’s novelty to get more kids hooked on exploring outdoors. Electronic screens will always be a temptation, but we can balance those indoor activities by putting nature back into young people’s daily routines. Doing so improves their health, their creativity, their self-confidence. And it helps nature: Today’s kids will be the next stewards of the natural world. Let’s help them learn to love it." Words by: Jaime Gonzalez 
To read more about how to hook kids to the great outdoors, read the full article in our link in bio! 🌿

Photo by: Devan King 
#nature  #kidsinnature
  • “These days, when I drive across the city, I don’t see alleys, parking lots and abandoned buildings. I see empty spaces waiting to be wild again. It’s like a blank canvas.

    As conservationists, we should be taking advantage of nature’s novelty to get more kids hooked on exploring outdoors. Electronic screens will always be a temptation, but we can balance those indoor activities by putting nature back into young people’s daily routines. Doing so improves their health, their creativity, their self-confidence. And it helps nature: Today’s kids will be the next stewards of the natural world. Let’s help them learn to love it." Words by: Jaime Gonzalez
    To read more about how to hook kids to the great outdoors, read the full article in our link in bio! 🌿

    Photo by: Devan King
    #nature #kidsinnature
  • 2,544 27 10 March, 2019
  • A woman waits to cross an intersection at K Street during rush hour as a storm called a derecho descends on Washington, D.C. The heavy line of storms dropped more than an inch of rain in an hour. Heavy rainstorms such as this create stormwater runoff in areas with a large amount of water repellant surfaces. The pollutants and waste that wash into waterways because of stormwater runoff is a major problem for cities, and the Nature Conservancy is working on different solutions to this issue. One of them is featured in our stories today – be sure to tune in! For the full story in Nature Conservancy Magazine, check the info in the link in bio. 👆
#stormwater #solutions #nature #cities

Photo by: @gregkahn
  • A woman waits to cross an intersection at K Street during rush hour as a storm called a derecho descends on Washington, D.C. The heavy line of storms dropped more than an inch of rain in an hour. Heavy rainstorms such as this create stormwater runoff in areas with a large amount of water repellant surfaces. The pollutants and waste that wash into waterways because of stormwater runoff is a major problem for cities, and the Nature Conservancy is working on different solutions to this issue. One of them is featured in our stories today – be sure to tune in! For the full story in Nature Conservancy Magazine, check the info in the link in bio. 👆
    #stormwater #solutions #nature #cities

    Photo by: @gregkahn
  • 2,760 27 7 March, 2019
  • A century-old longleaf pine rises above palmetto and wire grass at the Conservancy's Disney Wilderness Preserve in Florida. The Conservancy helps to protect crucial properties in the northern Everglades, bringing together a broad coalition of groups working to create a continuous swath of wildlife habitat and water connectivity from the Everglades headwaters down to Florida Bay. 💯

Photo by: @carltonward 
#nature #conservation #florida #everglades
  • A century-old longleaf pine rises above palmetto and wire grass at the Conservancy's Disney Wilderness Preserve in Florida. The Conservancy helps to protect crucial properties in the northern Everglades, bringing together a broad coalition of groups working to create a continuous swath of wildlife habitat and water connectivity from the Everglades headwaters down to Florida Bay. 💯

    Photo by: @carltonward
    #nature #conservation #florida #everglades
  • 3,849 29 6 March, 2019
  • "The stuff of Hollywood postcards and iconic drives, Los Angeles’ palm trees are dying, and the city isn’t planning to replace them—at least not with the same trees. The old palms—only one species of which is native to the state—are increasingly the victims of both a drying climate and attacks of the South American palm weevil. Now the palm trees are joining the ranks of the American chestnut and elm in a long list of iconic trees in the United States that have succumbed to invasive pests. Local tree advocates are working with the city to replace the palms with shade trees better adapted to hot, dry climates." Words by: Jenny Rogers 
Discover more about these trees in the link in our bio. 🌴
Photos by: Robson Hatsukami, Trent Szmolnik, Jack Finnigan and Everardo Gonzalez (@el_pollo8).
  • "The stuff of Hollywood postcards and iconic drives, Los Angeles’ palm trees are dying, and the city isn’t planning to replace them—at least not with the same trees. The old palms—only one species of which is native to the state—are increasingly the victims of both a drying climate and attacks of the South American palm weevil. Now the palm trees are joining the ranks of the American chestnut and elm in a long list of iconic trees in the United States that have succumbed to invasive pests. Local tree advocates are working with the city to replace the palms with shade trees better adapted to hot, dry climates." Words by: Jenny Rogers
    Discover more about these trees in the link in our bio. 🌴
    Photos by: Robson Hatsukami, Trent Szmolnik, Jack Finnigan and Everardo Gonzalez (@el_pollo8).
  • 4,107 45 4 March, 2019
  • The weekend is here and it’s time to relax! Hope you enjoy this great image of a Gálapagos sea lion pup (Zalophus wollebaeki) by Steve Dimock. Did you know that this species is the smallest of the sea lions? . . . .

#GalapagosIslands #Ecuador #Seal #Wildlife #Conservation #Ocean
  • The weekend is here and it’s time to relax! Hope you enjoy this great image of a Gálapagos sea lion pup (Zalophus wollebaeki) by Steve Dimock. Did you know that this species is the smallest of the sea lions? . . . .

    #GalapagosIslands #Ecuador #Seal #Wildlife #Conservation #Ocean
  • 11,315 78 1 March, 2019
  • The northern saw-whet owl (Aegolius acadicus) is native to North America. Their habitat is coniferous forests and sometimes mixed or deciduous woods. They are an adaptive species that can do well in the cold— and can range far north into Canada and Alaska. What’s your favorite species of owl? Photo by Anna Nitschke .
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#birdwatching #ornithology #owls #NorthAmerica #wildlife
  • The northern saw-whet owl (Aegolius acadicus) is native to North America. Their habitat is coniferous forests and sometimes mixed or deciduous woods. They are an adaptive species that can do well in the cold— and can range far north into Canada and Alaska. What’s your favorite species of owl? Photo by Anna Nitschke .
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    #birdwatching #ornithology #owls #NorthAmerica #wildlife
  • 9,638 90 28 February, 2019
  • The Murray-Darling Basin is one of the world’s largest and most productive river basins, supporting a $24 billion agricultural industry and providing one third of Australia’s food supply. It harbors some of our most important natural assets, supporting a diverse array of animals, plants and ecosystems of national and international significance. This includes 35 endangered birds and 16 endangered mammals. To address these environmental concerns, @nature_aus established the Murray-Darling Basin Balanced Water Fund to provide water security for farmers, while protecting culturally-significant wetlands that support threatened species and ecosystems. The Fund invests in permanent water rights in the Southern Murray-Darling Basin and allocates those rights in a smart way. When water is abundant and agricultural demand is lower, more water will be made available to local wetlands. When water is scarce and agricultural demand is higher, more water will be made available to irrigation. This approach optimizes agricultural and environmental outcomes by replicating the natural wetting and drying cycles of the Basin. It’s a win-win approach, aligning the interests of people and nature. Photos by Andrew Peacock #Australia #MurrayDarling #Sustainable #Conservation
  • The Murray-Darling Basin is one of the world’s largest and most productive river basins, supporting a $24 billion agricultural industry and providing one third of Australia’s food supply. It harbors some of our most important natural assets, supporting a diverse array of animals, plants and ecosystems of national and international significance. This includes 35 endangered birds and 16 endangered mammals. To address these environmental concerns, @nature_aus established the Murray-Darling Basin Balanced Water Fund to provide water security for farmers, while protecting culturally-significant wetlands that support threatened species and ecosystems. The Fund invests in permanent water rights in the Southern Murray-Darling Basin and allocates those rights in a smart way. When water is abundant and agricultural demand is lower, more water will be made available to local wetlands. When water is scarce and agricultural demand is higher, more water will be made available to irrigation. This approach optimizes agricultural and environmental outcomes by replicating the natural wetting and drying cycles of the Basin. It’s a win-win approach, aligning the interests of people and nature. Photos by Andrew Peacock #Australia #MurrayDarling #Sustainable #Conservation
  • 6,479 39 28 February, 2019
  • An aerial view of the Holmes River, British Columbia, Canada. The water was extra blue due to an increased glacial melt. 
The Nature Conservancy is proud to have helped to protect more than 119 million acres (about 48 million hectares) of land and conserve thousands of river mile to develop more than 100 marine projects. 
Photo by: @4elementphotos 
#rivers #waters #conservation
  • An aerial view of the Holmes River, British Columbia, Canada. The water was extra blue due to an increased glacial melt.
    The Nature Conservancy is proud to have helped to protect more than 119 million acres (about 48 million hectares) of land and conserve thousands of river mile to develop more than 100 marine projects.
    Photo by: @4elementphotos
    #rivers #waters #conservation
  • 6,460 48 23 February, 2019